The Hoarding Issue at KU and Why It’s Not a Problem

KU2
(Photo by Orlin Wagner, Salina Journal)

There is a hoarding issue in Lawrence, Kan., and specifically within the confines of Allen Fieldhouse. The University of Kansas (KU) men’s basketball team has just clinched a share of their 12th straight Big XII Conference title and a 12th consecutive trophy. Let’s put that into perspective. When KU won the first title in this streak:

  • It began three consecutive, four-year classes to attend KU who would never know life without their men’s team taking home the conference title
  • KU has won consecutive titles four more years than anyone can currently be President of the United States
  • Twitter had yet to be invented
  • Million Dollar Baby won Best Picture and Gwen Stefani’s “Hollaback Girl” was the most downloaded song of the year
  • George W. Bush was sworn in for his second term as US President
  • Gas was around $1.94 per gallon … so I guess some things have stayed the same

This feat trails only UCLA by one year for most all time, in an era where parody in college athletics may be at an all-time high. They also did it this year with arguably the best job done by their future Hall-of-Fame coach, Bill Self. As a blue-blood program, they’ve had All-Americans, staunch rim protectors, and dynamic playmakers. While this year’s team was good, it seemed to lack some of those standout performers in prior years.

But that didn’t matter.

What resulted was the continuation of KU’s hoarding problem in the form of conference trophies.

So what’s the secret? A multitude of things: a combination of KU’s dominance at home (it’s won nearly 40 straight), a raucous home crowd, and hell, maybe even the ghost of Phog Allen himself. But it boils down to an Oklahoma State graduate who was passed over by Missouri … Bill Self.

Each year, the master motivator finds a way to orchestrate the best from each of his players, while executing a delicate balance of tough love tactics. Perhaps the best part is any coach or midday manager can practice some of the same principles Self has seemed to master:

  • Play to Your Team’s Strengths: KU doesn’t have a dominant player this year, so instead, KU focused on its point guards pushing the pace and ball movement throughout the team. In the workplace, solid work by the entire team helps lift the burden of work on any one individual while helping the team accomplish its goals.
  • Expect Greatness: Despite replacing his entire lineup several times during the streak, Self never expected any less from his players than continuing to challenge for the title. Inside office walls, while much may be given to employees (flexible schedules, jeans on Fridays, team outings), much should also be expected … and then their performance should be recognized and rewarded.
  • Press the Right Buttons: Self likes to publicly question his team’s toughness in interviews when the team may have lost one or two games or he feels they’re not playing to their potential. After a shaky three-game stretch a month ago, Self again wondered if his team was “too soft” and they promptly found their form on their way to a 12th straight title. While calling employees soft in the workplace isn’t appropriate for many reasons, tuning it to what motivates each of your employees – regular compliments, tough love, subtle suggestions – is the perfect balance to have your team running on all cylinders.
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