The K-State Way: Improve A Little Bit Every Day

K-State's 'family' ties propelled the team to a 2016 Texas Bowl championship. Photo by Bo Rader, Wichita Eagle

K-State’s ‘family’ ties propelled the team to a 2016 Texas Bowl championship. Photo by Bo Rader, Wichita Eagle

Kansas State (K-State) Coach Bill Snyder did it again. He took a team with little to no expectations – picked 8th in the 10-team Big 12 – along with having the youngest squad in his 25 years with the school and finished fourth in the league, capping the season with a win in the 2016 Texas Bowl. Their 9-4 season marked the 14th time in his 25-year tenure with K-State in which his football team has won 9 or more games. That’s 56 percent of the time; not bad for regular winning percentage, but almost unbelievable for a percentage of winning nearly double-digit games for a quarter of a century.

Fans may also point out that the 2016 team is also the unofficial Texas State Champs, defeating all five Power 5 conference teams they played from the state: Baylor, TCU, Texas, Texas Tech and Texas A&M.

So how does he (and K-State) do it, and what can any company or organization learn from it? The secret is not one at all, but rather very public: 16 Goals for Success:

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16 goals. In our daily world, it may be a lot to remember. But I believe if you focus on one in particular, the rest will follow: Goal No. 4: Improve Every Day. Or as Coach Snyder often says, “Improve just a little bit every day.”

This helps large tasks seem manageable and puts you on a path of continued improvement, constant focus, and relentless determination.

Not sure how you’ll achieve a 365-pecent increase in sales for the year? “Improve just a little bit every day” and aim for only 1 percent per day. By the end of the year, you’ll have met your goal.

How do I even start putting together a strategic plan for 2017? “Improve just a little bit every day” and start with only three objectives you want to accomplish; it will build momentum and likely spur more ideas for a well-developed plan.

How do I keep up with the trends in my industry when new items are developing seemingly every day? “Improve just a little bit every day” and pick one to focus on; you’ll become a specialist on that item, carving out a niche for yourself and your newfound expertise.

While we embark on a new year many will inevitably attempt resolutions to stop something, start something, or try something else. However, focusing on measurable ways of “improving just a little bit every day” will truly show you how far you’ve come and 2017 will be marked as a year of growth and accomplishment instead of possible regret and underachievement.

And while you may not make 16 goals for yourself in the new year, or lead a team to a bowl win, by “improving just a little bit every day” you will accomplish one thing: become a resounding success.

The Hoarding Issue at KU and Why It’s Not a Problem

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(Photo by Orlin Wagner, Salina Journal)

There is a hoarding issue in Lawrence, Kan., and specifically within the confines of Allen Fieldhouse. The University of Kansas (KU) men’s basketball team has just clinched a share of their 12th straight Big XII Conference title and a 12th consecutive trophy. Let’s put that into perspective. When KU won the first title in this streak:

  • It began three consecutive, four-year classes to attend KU who would never know life without their men’s team taking home the conference title
  • KU has won consecutive titles four more years than anyone can currently be President of the United States
  • Twitter had yet to be invented
  • Million Dollar Baby won Best Picture and Gwen Stefani’s “Hollaback Girl” was the most downloaded song of the year
  • George W. Bush was sworn in for his second term as US President
  • Gas was around $1.94 per gallon … so I guess some things have stayed the same

This feat trails only UCLA by one year for most all time, in an era where parody in college athletics may be at an all-time high. They also did it this year with arguably the best job done by their future Hall-of-Fame coach, Bill Self. As a blue-blood program, they’ve had All-Americans, staunch rim protectors, and dynamic playmakers. While this year’s team was good, it seemed to lack some of those standout performers in prior years.

But that didn’t matter.

What resulted was the continuation of KU’s hoarding problem in the form of conference trophies.

So what’s the secret? A multitude of things: a combination of KU’s dominance at home (it’s won nearly 40 straight), a raucous home crowd, and hell, maybe even the ghost of Phog Allen himself. But it boils down to an Oklahoma State graduate who was passed over by Missouri … Bill Self.

Each year, the master motivator finds a way to orchestrate the best from each of his players, while executing a delicate balance of tough love tactics. Perhaps the best part is any coach or midday manager can practice some of the same principles Self has seemed to master:

  • Play to Your Team’s Strengths: KU doesn’t have a dominant player this year, so instead, KU focused on its point guards pushing the pace and ball movement throughout the team. In the workplace, solid work by the entire team helps lift the burden of work on any one individual while helping the team accomplish its goals.
  • Expect Greatness: Despite replacing his entire lineup several times during the streak, Self never expected any less from his players than continuing to challenge for the title. Inside office walls, while much may be given to employees (flexible schedules, jeans on Fridays, team outings), much should also be expected … and then their performance should be recognized and rewarded.
  • Press the Right Buttons: Self likes to publicly question his team’s toughness in interviews when the team may have lost one or two games or he feels they’re not playing to their potential. After a shaky three-game stretch a month ago, Self again wondered if his team was “too soft” and they promptly found their form on their way to a 12th straight title. While calling employees soft in the workplace isn’t appropriate for many reasons, tuning it to what motivates each of your employees – regular compliments, tough love, subtle suggestions – is the perfect balance to have your team running on all cylinders.

2 Tactics That Could Have Cleaned Up College Football Playoff’s Muddy Messaging

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On Dec. 7, the College Football Playoff Selection Committee unveiled the four teams that would be participating in this year’s inaugural event … and it was not without controversy. Alabama (1), Oregon (2), Florida State (3), and Ohio State (4) received the nod. Who did not make it? A representative from the Big 12 Conference.

Views from all sides debated various points including Ohio State’s bad loss, Baylor’s soft non-conference schedule, and TCU’s loss to Baylor. But a lot of the confusion should be focused on the Playoff Selection Committee and the Big 12 Conference itself. Why?

The Committee would seemingly use different metrics each week when evaluating teams, while supposedly only using the “eye” test. Some decisions were baffling, such as listing TCU one week at No. 3, while Florida State who hasn’t lost a game in two years moved down the list. Then TCU got bounced after winning…by 50 points in a conference game.

Meanwhile, the Big 12 Conference touted a “One True Champion” all year long, but at season’s end, it awarded two championship trophies, including one to a team that lost the league tiebreaker to the other. It also did not have a conference game, where the other major conferences did.

With only four positions and five power conferences, the odds dictate that one conference has the potential to be on the sidelines while the other conferences get to take the field. Even so, how could this year’s process – which was new to everyone – been handled better? Simple: clearer communication through these two tactics:

  • Consistent Critiques: The Committee said conference championship games and the overall season played a role in evaluating teams. However during the season, it stated it was picking the best four teams for the given week.
    • Instead of seemingly making up rules as they went along, the Committee should have outlined all of their criteria at the beginning of the year. This way, the Big 12 – which does not have a championship game – would have known its representative essentially had to win all of its games to be nearly guaranteed a spot in the playoff, instead of held powerless during the selection.
  • Don’t Trump the Tagline: The Big 12 touted having “One True Champion” all year because all teams in the conference play one other. But when the season was over, the conference presented two co-champions for playoff consideration.
    • Sometimes two isn’t better than one. The Conference should have used its own tiebreaker and presented Baylor as its “One True Champion,” helping to simplify the selection process for the committee. Instead, the committee chose the “true champions” from the other four conferences.

As they say in sports, better luck next year.